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The role of a headline is to give you the broadest outline of a story, not to explain every detail to you (that's what the article is for).

"Swedish PM Steps Down" is a headline.

"Swedish PM Steps Down to Pursue Art" is also fine.

"Stefan Löfven, current Prime Minister of Sweden, a country in Europe, is giving up his job, which is currently head of state, because he wants to spend more time drawing kittens (drawing is a form of art which he enjoys)" is not a headline.

Spoiler: the swedish PM hasn't actually stepped down. It's just an example 😅

Further to this unless a distro/app/person is VERY well known, I often generalise or contextualise it in a headline:

"Regolith, the i3-based Linux Distro, Adds Foo"

Not everyone knows "Regolith", what it is, etc.

Same with:

"New Linux Phone Goes on Sale"
vs "CherryMax Pro Goes on Sale"

The former tells you a phone powered by Linux has gone on sale. And if you like Linux, why you'll care.

The latter just tells you *something* has gone on sale, with no broader info.

@omgubuntu
100% agree, and I appreciate your useful headlines. 🙂

@omgubuntu

I'd personally argue that the second one is better because it encapsulates an implied story structure of three acts, and therefore is more communicative than the first. (But I'm not a headline editor and my job is not to get people to click on shit.)

@omgubuntu You won't believe what kitten was drawn next.

8 kitten drawings that will change your life.

With this guide anyone can become Swedish PM.

Watch how a PM changes the live of everyone.

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