@alcinnz No, but "open source" was promoted specifically to sell free software to capitalists. I think that was enabled by the explicit refusal of free software activists to identify it as anticapitalist. The result is that today we have more free software every day while it becomes harder and harder to live without proprietary software. archive.fosdem.org/2019/schedu

@alcinnz Wow, the response to that toot reinspired me to work on that article I started writing about that.

@alcinnz I wish someone had mentioned that to the people who spent six months in 2019 relentlessly harassing Glimpse contributors because they thought we were enemy combatants in an imaginary online culture war.

Linux rant 

@alcinnz
> So instead of finding ways to make it easier for regular people to write their own software, they made it harder.

This goes to Linux purists, too. By the end of the 90s we should have:

* created a cross platform equivalent of Visual Basic
* allowed small enterprise developers to write for-pay sw that also mean on Linux, challenging Microsoft's status quo
* created cross platform software like video and audio editors.

No, there was no shortage of Linux developers back then. There was a huge amount of developers who were forced out of the scene by team leaders' pride and whims.

These team leaders kept "promoting" Linux by denying Windows users the opportunity to use free software; they kept writing Linux-only software and mocked and attacked Windows users as if they were the enemy; they mistook UX complaints for personal insults; they forced users to take a leap of faith to an incomplete, hard to use platform that only wizards could use.

Linux rant 

@yuki Unfortunately: Amen. And I don't even want to go down the drain again ranting about the incredible amount of redundant work done in, like, building yet another window manager, yet another lightweight networking protocol, yet another half-a___d desktop environment for the sake of it rather than jumping in as part of a larger whole and making better (or even great) what's out there already. 😟

@alcinnz

Linux rant 

@z428 @yuki @alcinnz Lots of this-like grassroot work lead to great pieces of software. Redundant, though...Let's call it development.
Think the rant is likely 10 years old and doesn't reflect the current state-of-art.

Linux rant 

@kunde_x
Yeah, except the state of the art is now dominated by corporations, e.g. Canonical.

@z428 @alcinnz

Linux rant 

@yuki @z428 @alcinnz Ok, but there're remaining tons of derivates/alternatives (I'm an arch user :archlinux: ) - independent from one monolith big tech company.

--> distrowatch.com/

Linux rant 

@kunde_x The problem seems deeper however... looking around, in my closer environment I see three kinds of people working on FLOSS projects: (a) Students and learners who want to learn new tricks and/or start building a career. (b) Employers of (larger) (tech) companies that earn a living in their day job and want to do some playground projects in their spare time. And (c) software devs working on FLOSS as a paid day job for their company. All of this is fine, but ...

@yuki @alcinnz

Linux rant 

@kunde_x ... at the same time difficult - because it always depends (in this way or the other, not even talking about things such as Google backing Mozilla or Google Summer of Code) upon other corporations to help fund FLOSS by making sure FLOSS developers can survive. There's hardly any reliable way for freelance or independent developers to work full-time and professionally on FLOSS. That's something we needed to fix if we want to make FLOSS both more ...

@yuki @alcinnz

Linux rant 

@kunde_x ... (self-)sustainable and less depending on large corporations. 😉

@yuki @alcinnz

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For people who care about, support, or build Free, Libre, and Open Source Software (FLOSS).